7 Simple Mantras for Healing and Transformation

7 Simple Mantras for Healing and Transformation
woman meditating
Roger Gabriel (Raghavanand)

Everything in creation is, at its most refined level, sound or vibration. Every tree, every flower, every part of your body has its own unique vibration. Even the qualities you express in your life such as happiness, joy, abundance, and love are vibrations.

When you are healthy, happy, and vibrant, these vibrations are harmonizing with each other like a magnificent cosmic symphony. However, if the vibration of any area becomes distorted, the harmony breaks down, leading to a lack of wholeness and some discomfort in your life. Many forms of healing are based on knowing the correct sound or vibration and reintroducing it into that area, whereby you can restore the balance, harmony, and comfort once again.

Nature itself is full of sounds—birds singing, the wind blowing through the trees, waves breaking on the beach, innocent children laughing, and so many more. Unfortunately, for much of our time nowadays, we separate ourselves from nature. When you spend time in nature, listening to these sounds, your physiology becomes harmonized with the rhythms and flow of nature.

All traditions of the world have used sound for healing, whether the beating of a drum, a bell, a gong, or a sacred chant. The ancient Vedic Tradition of India has taken this a step further, exploring and refining the use of sound over thousands of years to formulate it into the Vedic Science of Mantras.

Mantras are specific sounds or vibrations whose effects are known. When either chanted aloud or repeated silently, they can create a desired effect in any area of your physiology or life—for healing, transformation, and inner awakening. This is, of course, a vast subject and there are mantras for everything from curing snakebites to spiritual awakening. It would take a whole lifetime to master this wisdom; however, we’ll discuss a few of the more practical uses here.

Japa

Japa means the repetition of a mantra so it encompasses all uses of mantras. However, Japa is most commonly associated with a fixed number of repetitions of a mantra. Usually a string of beads, known as a Mala, with a set number of beads would be used to keep count—one repetition per bead. Traditionally, most Malas have 108 “counter” beads and a “guru” bead used to indicate where to begin and end. Sometimes shorter malas with 54 or 27 beads can be used with longer mantras.

Using the Mala will often involve making a commitment. Let’s say you have a particular obstacle in your life. Knowing the mantra to help harmonize that situation, you might choose to repeat it 108 times (one Mala) for the next 30 days.

Deity Mantra

There are literally thousands of deities in the Eastern traditions, each associated with a different attribute and each having its own mantra, which invokes that attribute. For a Hindu, repeating one of these mantras would be a form of worshipping that deity. However, for those …read more
Source: Deepak Chopra

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