Take a few minutes to learn the 2-minute drill

Take a few minutes to learn the 2-minute drill
Business Communication Duplicate model

I could fill volumes about chance meetings that have changed people’s lives, led to jobs, business opportunities, partnerships, new ideas . . . all because people sought other people with similar interests.

The secret is to seek them out.

Every time I’m in a line, on a plane, at a sporting event, wherever … I introduce myself.  I’ve met some of my best customers on a plane, resulting in millions of dollars in business.  You always have to have your antennae up.

I think this is one of the biggest mistakes people make.  They don’t introduce themselves when they have an opportunity.  It seems like no one talks to anyone anymore.  Social media is a wonderful tool, but it shouldn’t be the only tool in your toolbox.  There is no substitute for personal interaction.

You’ve heard me expound on the notion that our lives basically change in two ways – the books we read and the people we meet.  I hammer that message home every time I speak to a group.  I also tell the audience that the people on your left, right, front and back, might be more important in building an effective network than any speaker you will hear over a lifetime.  Your network will have a tremendous impact on your net worth.

I’m not the only one who thinks that way.  Warren Buffet, the billionaire investment genius, claims, “If you improve your communication skills, I will guarantee you that you will earn 50 percent more money over your lifetime.”

When I speak I share a time-tested exercise to help develop communication skills – the two-minute drill.  I did this two-minute drill for the first time in my hometown of Minneapolis in the early ’90s with 1,000 people in the audience.  Within two weeks, I received over 35 letters and cards telling me that thanks to the drill they were either doing business with the person they met or had a high probability of doing business with them.  And I’d bet there were plenty of others who struck oil but didn’t bother to write.  This exercise is meaningful because almost invariably my mail tells me that it really “jump starts” the habit of networking.

Here’s how the drill works:  …read more
Source: Harvey Mackay